Doug Jaffe Law

845 University Ave.
Sacramento, CA 95825

Call For A Free Consultation

(916) 381-2011

Doug Jaffe Law

The general statute of limitations for a work injury is one year or five years, but there are many defenses to that. The statute of limitations is an affirmative defense, which means it is something the employer has to prove. For example, an employee will often tell their employer that they have a work injury and the employer does not give them the proper forms to fill out or turn the injury into the insurance carrier. Even if that is done, the insurance carrier will oftentimes be required to send out notices and if they do not send out notices, then you have a defense to the statute of limitations. The statute of limitations is very fluid when it comes to workers’ compensation cases.

What Is The Date Of Injury Of A Cumulative Trauma?

The date of injury of a cumulative trauma is determined by the doctor and will depend on what part of the work activities are harmful and caused the medical injury. The date will depend on a variety of factors, including medical treatment. It can be important for the statute of limitations.

What Is The Process Of A Cumulative Trauma Claim?

The process of a cumulative trauma claim is similar to the process for a specific claim. If a worker has an industrial injury, then after the worker sees an attorney, the attorney will file an application. Then, the medical records will be obtained and a doctor will be obtained to determine whether there is, in fact, an industrial injury and the extent of the industrial injury. The most important factor is that the insurance company will pay for these doctors and also pay for the medical records.

The case should be concluded within a year, when the doctor says you’ve reached maximum medical improvement. Even then, it can take longer than that. A workers’ compensation case does take some time to litigate. The case should not generally be settled until all the medical treatment has been completed.

How Do I Prove My Injury?

The first step to proving an injury is to turn it into the employer. The employer will then give an injured worker a DWC1 form, which the employer has to fill out along with the injured worker, and then send to the employer’s insurance company. The next step is to consult a competent workers’ compensation attorney. An application will then be filed in front of the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board, which gives the board jurisdiction to award benefits, such as temporary disability benefits, permanent disability benefits, or medical care. Then, the records will be obtained and there will be an appointment scheduled with a doctor to evaluate the extent of the injured workers’ disability.

Based on that report, benefits can be provided. If there is a dispute, then the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board will be able to resolve it. Sometimes, in a small percentage of cases, the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board will have to have a trial and issue an award of benefits. Usually, cases will settle prior to trial and that is usually a good deal for the injured worker. What the amount of the settlement will depend on the specific factors of the case and the medical evidence involved in the case.

A workers’ compensation attorney can take the depositions of the doctors, obtain evidence, and take a number of other steps, which will increase the award for the injured worker. The insurance carrier has hired adjusters and trained those adjusters to pay as little money as possible. If they end up paying half of what a case is really worth, they will be rewarded. You need a skilled attorney working on your behalf.

For more information on Statute Of Limitations For Cumulative Trauma, a free initial consultation is your next best step. Get the information and legal answers you are seeking by calling (916) 381-2011 today.

Doug Jaffe Law

Call For A Free Consultation
(916) 381-2011